Droppin Science

Droppin  Science Author William Eric Perkins
ISBN-10 1566393620
Release 1996
Pages 276
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Eleven essays analyze various aspects of hip-hop that are usually neglected, including coverage of female and Latino contributions to both rap and hip-hop culture.



Droppin Science

Droppin  Science Author Denise L. McIver
ISBN-10 0609807293
Release 2002
Pages 157
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Presents words of wisdom from some of hip-hop's greatest stars, including DMX, Eminem, Lauryn Hill, and Dr. Dre, on everything from education and real love to spirituality, happiness, and achievement.



Music and Game

Music and Game Author Peter Moormann
ISBN-10 9783531189130
Release 2012-08-11
Pages 223
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This anthology examines the various facets of video game music. Contributors from the fields of science and practice document its historical development, discuss the music’s composition techniques, interactivity and function as well as attending to its performative aspects.



Digital Diaspora

Digital Diaspora Author Anna Everett
ISBN-10 079147674X
Release 2009-02-05
Pages 248
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Traces the rise of black participation in cyberspace.



Let s Get Free

Let s Get Free Author Paul Butler
ISBN-10 9781595585103
Release 2010-06-08
Pages 224
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Drawing on his personal fascinating story as a prosecutor, a defendant, and an observer of the legal process, Paul Butler offers a sharp and engaging critique of our criminal justice system. He argues against discriminatory drug laws and excessive police power and shows how our policy of mass incarceration erodes communities and perpetuates crime. Controversially, he supports jury nullification—or voting “not guilty” out of principle—as a way for everyday people to take a stand against unfair laws, and he joins with the “Stop Snitching” movement, arguing that the reliance on informants leads to shoddy police work and distrust within communities. Butler offers instead a “hip hop theory of justice,” parsing the messages about crime and punishment found in urban music and culture. Butler’s argument is powerful, edgy, and incisive.



Ghetto Religiosity 2000

Ghetto Religiosity 2000 Author Khalil Amani
ISBN-10 9780595137107
Release 2000
Pages 268
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Ghetto Religiosity 2000 is the first of a three-part series. It is the result of Mr. Amani's many years of study and disillusionment with organized religion. Often angry and filled with ebonics and gangsta language, the author's quest is to reach those who have been removed from religion... those of us who have seen the church and the preacher manipulate the laity for their own selfish filthy lucre. If you're looking to read a watered-down "Jesus loves the world" text, this is not for you! This book is a hardcore, tellin'-it-like-it-is, new-jack, diatribe on the errors of Judeo-Christian Thought. WHO SHALL MAKE IT PLAIN? WHO SHALL TEACH THE YOUTH? WHO SHALL SET THEM FREE? —Khalil Amani, a religious gangsta Khalil Amani is a native of Miami, Florida where he was baptized at the age of seven into the Baptist Church. After high school, Khalil was introduced to Black Nationalism, fraternal brotherhood, Freemasonry, the Nation of Islam, and the Five Percent Nation. None of these held his attention until he was introduced to the Nation of Yahweh where he joined and quickly rose to the rank of Elder. By age 23, Khalil headed the Temple of Yahweh in Newark, New Jersey. After five years and the realization that he was part of a murderous cult, headed by a man claiming to be God, he left the sect in search of his identity and the true meaning of religion. Left spiritually devastated by this experience, Khalil resorted to the street-life where he indulged in every vice, from selling drugs to becoming an exotic dancer to stick-up man to womanizer. Finally, Khalil became the "Unofficial Spokesman" for ex-members of the Yahweh cult and testified against the man he once called father. For this he had to enter the Witness Protection Program. This brotha has been through some sect! At the University of Nebraska at Omaha, he majored in Black Studies and Religion and graduated from San Diego Mesa College, San Diego, California with a degree in English.



Mambo Montage

Mambo Montage Author Agustín Laó-Montes
ISBN-10 9780231505444
Release 2012-10-02
Pages 448
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New York is the capital of mambo and a global factory of latinidad. This book covers the topic in all its multifaceted aspects, from Jim Crow baseball in the first half of the twentieth century to hip hop and ethno-racial politics, from Latinas and labor unions to advertising and Latino culture, from Cuban cuisine to the language of signs in New York City. Together the articles map out the main conceptions of Latino identity as well as the historical process of Latinization of New York. Mambo Montage is both a way of imagining latinidad and an angle of vision on the city.



Pulse of the People

Pulse of the People Author Lakeyta M. Bonnette
ISBN-10 9780812291131
Release 2015-03-02
Pages 232
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Hip-Hop music encompasses an extraordinarily diverse range of approaches to politics. Some rap and Hip-Hop artists engage directly with elections and social justice organizations; others may use their platform to call out discrimination, poverty, sexism, racism, police brutality, and other social ills. In Pulse of the People, Lakeyta M. Bonnette illustrates the ways rap music serves as a vehicle for the expression and advancement of the political thoughts of urban Blacks, a population frequently marginalized in American society and alienated from electoral politics. Pulse of the People lays a foundation for the study of political rap music and public opinion research and demonstrates ways in which political attitudes asserted in the music have been transformed into direct action and behavior of constituents. Bonnette examines the history of rap music and its relationship to and extension from other cultural and political vehicles in Black America, presenting criteria for identifying the specific subgenre of music that is political rap. She complements the statistics of rap music exposure with lyrical analysis of rap songs that espouse Black Nationalist and Black Feminist attitudes. Touching on a number of critical moments in American racial politics—including the 2008 and 2012 elections and the cases of the Jena 6, Troy Davis, and Trayvon Martin—Pulse of the People makes a compelling case for the influence of rap music in the political arena and greatly expands our understanding of the ways political ideologies and public opinion are formed.



Energy Flash

Energy Flash Author Simon Reynolds
ISBN-10 9781593764777
Release 2012-03-01
Pages 512
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Ecstasy did for house music what LSD did for psychedelic rock. Now, in Energy Flash, journalist Simon Reynolds offers a revved-up and passionate inside chronicle of how MDMA (“ecstasy”) and MIDI (the basis for electronica) together spawned the unique rave culture of the 1990s. England, Germany, and Holland began tinkering with imported Detroit techno and Chicago house music in the late 1980s, and when ecstasy was added to the mix in British clubs, a new music subculture was born. A longtime writer on the music beat, Reynolds started watching—and partaking in—the rave scene early on, observing firsthand ecstasy’s sense-heightening and serotonin-surging effects on the music and the scene. In telling the story, Reynolds goes way beyond straight music history, mixing social history, interviews with participants and scene-makers, and his own analysis of the sounds with the names of key places, tracks, groups, scenes, and artists. He delves deep into the panoply of rave-worthy drugs and proper rave attitude and etiquette, exposing a nuanced musical phenomenon. Read on, and learn why is nitrous oxide is called “hippy crack.”



Latino a Popular Culture

Latino a Popular Culture Author Michelle Habell-Pallan
ISBN-10 0814736246
Release 2002-06-01
Pages 280
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While the presence of Latinos and Latinas in mainstream news and in popular culture in the United States buttresses the much-heralded Latin Explosion, the images themselves are often contradictory. Latino/a Popular Culture brings together scholars from the humanities and social sciences to analyze representations of Latinidad in a diversity of genres.



Hispanic New York

Hispanic New York Author Claudio Iván Remeseira
ISBN-10 9780231519779
Release 2010-06-18
Pages 576
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Over the past few decades, a wave of immigration has turned New York into a microcosm of the Americas and enhanced its role as the crossroads of the English- and Spanish-speaking worlds. Yet far from being an alien group within a "mainstream" and supposedly pure "Anglo" America, people referred to as Hispanics or Latinos have been part and parcel of New York since the beginning of the city's history. They represent what Walt Whitman once celebrated as "the Spanish element of our nationality." Hispanic New York is the first anthology to offer a comprehensive view of this multifaceted heritage. Combining familiar materials with other selections that are either out of print or not easily accessible, Claudio Iván Remeseira makes a compelling case for New York as a paradigm of the country's Latinoization. His anthology mixes primary sources with scholarly and journalistic essays on history, demography, racial and ethnic studies, music, art history, literature, linguistics, and religion, and the authors range from historical figures, such as José Martí, Bernardo Vega, or Whitman himself, to contemporary writers, such as Paul Berman, Ed Morales, Virginia Sánchez Korrol, Roberto Suro, and Ana Celia Zentella. This unique volume treats the reader to both the New York and the American experience, as reflected and transformed by its Hispanic and Latino components.



The Organic Globalizer

The Organic Globalizer Author Christopher Malone
ISBN-10 9781628920086
Release 2014-11-20
Pages 304
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The Organic Globalizer is a collection of critical essays which takes the position that hip-hop holds political significance through an understanding of its ability to at once raise cultural awareness, expand civil society's focus on social and economic justice through institution building, and engage in political activism and participation. Collectively, the essays assert hip hop's importance as an "organic globalizer:†? no matter its pervasiveness or reach around the world, hip-hop ultimately remains a grassroots phenomenon that is born of the community from which it permeates. Hip hop, then, holds promise through three separate but related avenues: (1) through cultural awareness and identification/recognition of voices of marginalized communities through music and art; (2) through social creation and the institutionalization of independent alternative institutions and non-profit organizations in civil society geared toward social and economic justice; and (3) through political activism and participation in which demands are articulated and made on the state. With editorial bridges between chapters and an emphasis on interdisciplinary and diverse perspectives, The Organic Globalizer is the natural scholarly evolution in the conversation about hip-hop and politics.



Clarity Cut and Culture

Clarity  Cut  and Culture Author Susan Falls
ISBN-10 9781479834396
Release 2014-06-13
Pages 224
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Images of diamonds appear everywhere in American culture. And everyone who has a diamond has a story to tell about it. Our stories about diamonds not only reveal what we do with these tiny stones, but also suggest how we create value, meaning, and identity through our interactions with material culture in general. Things become meaningful through our interactions with them, but how do people go about making meaning? What can we learn from an ethnography about the production of identity, creation of kinship, and use of diamonds in understanding selves and social relationships? By what means do people positioned within a globalized political-economy and a compelling universe of advertising interact locally with these tiny polished rocks? This book draws on 12 months of fieldwork with diamond consumers in New York City as well as an analysis of the iconic De Beers campaign that promised romance, status, and glamour to anyone who bought a diamond to show that this thematic pool is just one resource among many that diamond owners draw upon to engage with their own stones. The volume highlights the important roles that memory, context, and circumstance also play in shaping how people interpret and then use objects in making personal worlds. It shows that besides operating as subjects in an ad-burdened universe, consumers are highly creative, idiosyncratic, and theatrical agents.



Encyclopedia of Race Ethnicity and Society

Encyclopedia of Race  Ethnicity  and Society Author Richard T. Schaefer
ISBN-10 9781412926942
Release 2008-03-20
Pages 1622
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This three volume reference set offers a comprehensive look at the roles race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives. General readers, students, and scholars alike will appreciate the informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. These volumes offer a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Over a hundred racial and ethnic groups are described, with additional thematic essays offering insight into broad topics that cut across group boundaries and which impact on society. The encyclopedia has alphabetically arranged author-signed essays with references to guide further reading. Numerous cross-references aid the reader to explore beyond specific entries, reflecting the interdependent nature of race and ethnicity operating in society. The text is supplemented by photographs, tables, figures and custom-designed maps to provide an engaging visual look at race and ethnicity. An easy-to-use statistical appendix offers the latest data with carefully selected historical comparisons to aid study and research in the area



Real Black

Real Black Author John L. Jackson Jr.
ISBN-10 0226390012
Release 2005-11-15
Pages 298
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New York's urban neighborhoods are full of young would-be emcees who aspire to "keep it real" and restaurants like Sylvia's famous soul food eatery that offer a taste of "authentic" black culture. In these and other venues, authenticity is considered the best way to distinguish the real from the phony, the genuine from the fake. But in Real Black, John L. Jackson Jr. proposes a new model for thinking about these issues—racial sincerity. Jackson argues that authenticity caricatures identity as something imposed on people, imprisoning them within stereotypes: an African American high school student who excels in the classroom, for instance, might be dismissed as "acting white." On the other hand, sincerity, as Jackson defines it, imagines authenticity as an incomplete measuring stick, an analytical model that attempts to deny people agency in their search for identity. Drawing on more than ten years of ethnographic research in and around New York City, Jackson offers a kaleidoscope of subjects and stories that directly and indirectly address how race is negotiated in today's world—including tales of book-vending numerologists, urban conspiracy theorists, corrupt police officers, mixed-race neo-Nazis, and gospel choirs forbidden to catch the Holy Ghost. Jackson records and retells their interconnected sagas, all the while attempting to reconcile these stories with his own crisis of identity and authority as an anthropologist terrified by fieldwork. Finding ethnographic significance where mere mortals see only bricks and mortar, his invented alter ego Anthroman takes to the streets, showing how race is defined and debated, imposed and confounded every single day.



The Games Black Girls Play

The Games Black Girls Play Author Kyra D. Gaunt
ISBN-10 0814731198
Release 2006-02-06
Pages 221
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2007 Alan Merriam Prize presented by the Society for Ethnomusicology 2007 PEN/Beyond Margins Book Award Finalist When we think of African American popular music, our first thought is probably not of double-dutch: girls bouncing between two twirling ropes, keeping time to the tick-tat under their toes. But this book argues that the games black girls play —handclapping songs, cheers, and double-dutch jump rope—both reflect and inspire the principles of black popular musicmaking. The Games Black Girls Play illustrates how black musical styles are incorporated into the earliest games African American girls learn—how, in effect, these games contain the DNA of black music. Drawing on interviews, recordings of handclapping games and cheers, and her own observation and memories of gameplaying, Kyra D. Gaunt argues that black girls' games are connected to long traditions of African and African American musicmaking, and that they teach vital musical and social lessons that are carried into adulthood. In this celebration of playground poetry and childhood choreography, she uncovers the surprisingly rich contributions of girls’ play to black popular culture.



Rapper Writer Pop Cultural Player

Rapper  Writer  Pop Cultural Player Author Dr Josephine Metcalf
ISBN-10 9781472418371
Release 2014-06-28
Pages 358
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This collection of essays critically engages with factors relating to black urban life and cultural representation in the post-civil rights era, using Ice-T and his myriad roles as musician, actor, writer, celebrity, and industrialist as a vehicle through which to interpret and understand the African American experience. Over the past three decades, African Americans have faced a number of new challenges brought about by changes in the political, economic and social structure of America. Furthermore, this vastly changed social landscape has produced a number of resonant pop-cultural trends that have proved to be both innovative and admired on the one hand, and contentious and divisive on the other. Ice-T’s iconic and multifarious career maps these shifts. This is the first book that, taken as a whole, looks at a black cultural icon's manipulation of (or manipulation by?) so many different forms simultaneously. The result is a fascinating series of tensions arising from Ice-T’s ability to inhabit conflicting pop-cultural roles including: ’hardcore’ gangsta rapper and dedicated philanthropist; author of controversial song Cop Killer and network television cop; self-proclaimed ‘pimp’ and reality television house husband. As the essays in this collection detail, Ice-T’s chameleonic public image consistently tests the accepted parameters of black cultural production, and in doing so illuminates the contradictions of a society erroneously dubbed ‘post-racial’.